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A new type of fake ID

Fake IDs remain a common form of deception for college students under 21 years old to get past the front door of a bar. For those caught, criminal consequences are often the result.

During a worldwide pandemic where COVID-19 vaccines provide access where the unvaccinated are potentially barred, a new form of faux identification is becoming popular. Many students resistant to the “jab” are using what are effectively counterfeit cards to show that they are fully vaccinated.

The unvaccinated claiming full vaccination

Anecdotal information backs up this trend. Recently, federal authorities seized fake vaccination records from a doctor selling them to patients. For college students already accustomed to deception to consume adult beverages, having a counterfeit card that verifies vaccination status is just another way to skirt different rules.

The “crime” is difficult to detect. Without a national database that stores health records, little can be done to back up the assertion. State vaccination registries are a possible tool. For now, vaccine verifications are being reviewed one at a time.

Many educational institutions are on the lookout for these fake cards. They not only examine them but require students to confirm their authenticity by signing a form. Should they get caught with a phony vaccination card, they will likely face discipline similar to those who commit acts of academic dishonesty.

Even those with formal verification procedures must endure a painstaking process due to the sheer amount of vaccine cards. Also, the cards are handwritten by the person administrating the vaccine. The element of human error can further complicate detecting deception.

With the potential of vaccine mandates at the federal level, severe consequences could follow a college student providing a fake vaccination card as legitimate. Those penalties could go beyond expulsion from an educational institution and potentially into the criminal realm.

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